a different place

R- When Jarika and I started this blog 4 years ago, I was a year into a standards based model for my music classes. I wanted to pretty much shout out to the world how crazy I was about it… how it was helping me be a better teacher, a more transparent teacher, how it was helping my students (their words, not mine) and how it was putting music into the same conversations as the other academic subject areas for once. It’s been an interesting journey since then. What I anticipated was that I would grow stronger in my convictions. I have. What I didn’t anticipate is that, certainly in Maine, the entire state would shift radically towards a proficiency model steeped in standards and that music teachers would do that shifting as well. Didn’t see that coming. The Maine Arts Leadership Initiative changed it’s name from Maine Arts Assessment Initiative to better reflect how we have morphed in that direction as well, but also to reflect that the need for the Assessment initiative has been displaced by the state movement. We’ve moved from, “Hey, get a load of how assessment practices can open amazing doors for us!” to, “How can we better lead the way in Maine toward the proficiency model our own schools are pursuing?”

It’s been a radical shift.

Assessment is no longer the dirty word. But it is still a messy one. Thanks to living in a local control state, the Maine DOE has left it to each school district to not only “implement” proficiency, it’s actually allowed each school district to determine for itself what proficiency actually means! Ugh. Certainly there’s pros and cons to that. We do get to do the deep thinking ourselves as a result that leads to exceptional practices. Unfortunately, I’ve observed precious little “deep thinking” going on. Instead I see a whole lot of school districts trying to figure out how to meet a mandate and what hoops it has to jump through. There may be better recipes for mediocrity, but I don’t know of ’em. We’ve gone from figuring out if standards and assessment practices are good or not to merely trying to implement something our schools will accept. But not only is the state to blame, our individual school districts are to blame. I have lost track of how many colleagues have told me that their administrators approached them with, “you may only have ‘x’ standards”, or “you need to make this fit our model” or “you need to have your standards aligned with visual art” (are the math standards aligned with social studies? Phys ed with science?). As a result, a golden opportunity for us as a state to do powerful introspective work has largely been transformed into bureaucratic b.s. that at best feels like yet another state initiative, at worst feels like the biggest waste of our time, trying to manipulate or contrive our work to jump through required work. It has also completely undermined the innate value of standards and proficiency in the process.

The losers in this however is not us, it’s our kids.

As we move deeper in the move toward proficiency, it really is time to remind our administrators – where needed – that schools are here to serve the needs of our kids and not the other way around; we cannot manipulate how we serve our kids to meet state mandates. We must manipulate what we do and how we practice it to meet the needs of our students. My challenge to my friends and colleagues in the field this year: make THAT the lens you view your work through this year. Our biennial state conference is this coming Friday and the primary focus is precisely that. The title is called Arts Education: the Measure Of Success, because that’s what our focus has to be. We are in a different place than we were 4 years ago. But let’s make very sure that place is a step or two forward and not just a random place to one side or the other – or backwards – just to meet another external state or local expectation. Our kids deserve better than that, and honestly, so do we.

YHS Choral Standards 2011-2012

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helplessness

R- My YHS Spring concert was last night. As is usually the case after these concerts, I’m waking up this morning physically and emotionally “spent”. It’s a curious thing to me how my emotions are all over the place. I feel as if they have all been through a Dairy Queen Blizzard machine. But it is a rare morning after a concert that I feel any joy. Instead the overwhelming feeling is one of helplessness. I’ve always been unsuccessful in articulating to others, and maybe even to myself, why that is. This morning I guess I’m using a blog post to cathartically try to do so. I hope it resonates with colleagues who choose to read this, because I don’t believe I’m alone in feeling this way.

I think in visual art, there is a point with one’s work where something feels completed. Where a work of art becomes what it was meant to be and then you display it for the world to see. It represents the artist’s vision, it reflects the artist’s skill, it elevates the medium which was utilized to create it. I wish I was a visual artist because that process is so organic and it also allows for closure. There’s a finality to it. The struggle I have always felt is that my medium is people. It is a joining of musicians who are brought together to share their skills. But it is also the composer in absentia. It is the vision and dreams and ideas and musical beliefs of every composer of every song that choir sings or that band plays. Because they are not in rehearsals or the performances, the conductor has an ethical and moral obligation to represent them. And the performers do to. Robert Shaw once alluded to his belief that singing in a choir is the most moral of all the arts… this is what he meant. In an ever greater illumination from Shaw,

All of music is an attempt at communication between human hearts and minds; at the very minimum the creator reaches out to and through the performer, and both of them reach out to the listener. Music is great not because certain self-appointed Custodians of Arts with a capital A have decreed it so, but because it calls out to something deep and persistent in the human thing. Music is great because it carries something so native and true to the human spirit that not even sophisticated intellectuality can deny or destroy its miracle.

As a result, I have long since come to a point in my life that for my non-school performances I have taken great pride and received great joy in being a choral director and putting on concerts. But this is rarely so for the concerts I do with my kids. Here is why that may be.

When you get together as a group of musicians, your focus is the music and you all share your talents and skills and artistic process to elevate it. This is much closer to the process of a visual artist. But in public school music, this couldn’t be further from the truth. It is not about the music, it’s about the kids. It’s about the community. It’s about the school. It’s about the curriculum and how the concert is an expression of it. It’s about developed and still developing skills that are on public display. Yet the requirements of being a musician and being an artist don’t go away. And these two extremes are incompatible. You cannot adequately do both in such ridiculously limited face time with students.

And I feel completely helpless as a result.

Now, that’s how I would feel if there was NEVER a public concert at the end of each term. But throw that into the mix?

Musically I hear all the things that aren’t the way I want them to be yet, and perhaps we could never reach, and it authentically bothers me. But I am simultaneously elated at the ability of my kids to pull off elements of wonderful musicality that any composer would be proud of. These two emotions are incompatible. I see the students who have a solo and are happy to the point of tears when they are done that they “did it” and are so proud, and I see the students who have a solo and are self critical enough to be depressed and sad with how they did. The emotions I feel toward both are incompatible. I know for Ticheli’s “There Will Be Rest” last night there were audience members who were transformed by that beautiful music. I also know there were those who were probably looking at their watch and yawning. I will never know how to reconcile my feelings around that.

Take that same song for a moment. For that selection, I know most if not all my chamber singers were disappointed with the performance. I could see it on their faces when they were done and while they were singing it. This was due to an intonation problem they developed right around page 8: they went sharp. We haven’t rehearsed since Monday, and when we ran it then, the group – for the first time ever – went a whole step flat. It was due to a lot of non musical factors, and belied the fact that intonation on that advanced selection had long ceased to be an issue for us. So I implored them on Monday to think sharp as they performed it in concert. Well, they actually did. It caused some intonation problems for a page and a half, and then they adjusted to the new key and brought it home safe and sound. Really, in many respects, a remarkable performance by 30 teenagers who are still learning and developing their craft. They were working, analytical artists who created a magnificent representation for our audience. The emotions I have around all this? Where do I begin? Pride over their display of musicianship. Elation over their demonstration of applied listening skills under duress. Disappointment in my myself for having instructed them on Monday to think sharp. Guilt over not having made the right choice in doing so. Sadness that they didn’t feel good about the performance. Frustration over their not understanding how good they should be feeling about it. Upset that the focus was not transferred over enough to the text. Doubting my skills – did I do enough for them? Helplessness.

Go back to my premise that there is a basic incompatibility between developing people through music (music the means to the end) and developing demonstrated musicianship in every student (academic accountability where music IS the end). I felt this too when I directed musicals. I did the directing and music directing both at all three schools I taught at. I loved every moment of it. And I hated every moment of it. It was the endless attempt to reconcile the two extremes. The difference is that in a co-curricular activity such as drama, there is a light at the end of the tunnel. The legacy is the show. In music education, the legacy is the skills. If it was the other way around, music would no longer be a curricular subject and that’s why I always rail about it being so. You can’t have it both ways: music belongs in the school day as an academic subject but, gee, it’s about the “experience”. Which way do you you want it? That however doesn’t stop every music teacher out there from moving heaven and earth to provide both. And there’s the helplessness. No parent ever left a concert saying to their son or daughter, “Wow, I loved the crescendo on page 8 when you simultaneously added ring to your tone and kept the consonants the same dynamics as your vowels”! They leave noting how happy their child was, and how moving it is to see them onstage creating art. But as educators we need to have one foot in both places. The problem is that I don’t believe it can humanly be done. One is invariably going to have to take precedence over the other. That however would be completely unsatisfactory. It would also be wrong. So the disconnect remains. Our schools require us to place our emphasis on the academic. They would be irresponsible to do otherwise, and I wouldn’t ever work for a school district ignorant enough NOT to place that expectation on me. On the other hand, I have a moral and ethical responsibility to bring to life the music of composers and utilize the developed and still developing skills of my students to do so. On yet one more hand, my highest priority – and I will quit teaching the day it isn’t – is to develop young adults, to foster their social, intellectual and emotional growth. To love every one of ’em, to take them where they are and elevate them, to challenge them ceaselessly while simultaneously keeping my chorus room a safety net for them.

As was the case in every High School in Maine this Spring, tons of kids missed regular classes as they were pulled to do statewide testing. They missed so much class time in their other subject areas, it was astounding. Simultaneously, I found out that the last spot in York capable of holding our concerts, St Christopher’s Church, was unable to host us this Spring. We had to hold our concert last night at Portsmouth High School and their auditorium. It was a Godsend that we were able to do so. But it also meant that if I was going to bus students to the performance hall for rehearsals like I normally do multiple times in the weeks prior to our concerts, I’d have to pull students out of other classes for the extended trip to New Hampshire. Because of all the Spring testing, I finally decided that I couldn’t do that to the kids or to my colleagues. I wasn’t being magnanimous in this decision, it simply was the right thing to do. So all three choirs showed up early last night for 20 minute rehearsals/run throughs in the new space to “get used to it”. They sing in a custom built, acoustically magnificent environment each day, and now they were in a 930 seat auditorium where they have little reflective sound. Chamber Singers couldn’t hear each other at the start of the run-through so we sang mixed. And that’s how we performed “There Will Be Rest”. For the first time in that hall. For the first time in public in a mixed setting. For the seniors final concert. And they went sharp and weren’t happy with the performance. After spending FIVE MONTHS preparing it. And my highest priority is to foster their growth and happiness as people?

Helplessness.

I am so grateful to be in this profession. But I often think, this morning for instance, that I do not possess the emotional stability to be a music educator and to also take on the responsibility for between 100 and 200 teenagers each term how they are each individually doing as people. I worry about the kids I didn’t get to high five or hug last night, are they doing okay? I worry about some of those kids I did high five and hug. I worry about my senior who wasn’t there last night in part because his mom passed away last week. I worry about the parents who wanted their sons or daughters to have opportunities for solos which I couldn’t provide. I worry about the kids who are going through difficult times in their life and am I doing enough for them? Am I even adequately aware of what they are going through. I worry about the seniors I said goodbye to last night and are they going to be okay after High School.

There were enough joys galore to write an equally lengthy blog post about. All the groups did a beautiful job. There were many moments of musical clarity that were emotionally powerful and artistically enlightening. Honestly. My Block 6 “Welcome Back Kotter” kids who I love dearly were sensational and showcased two marathons worth of work and growth since they first arrived on my doorstep the last week of January. A teacher could not be more proud or happy. My Chambers seniors made a presentation in the middle of the concert and we had a group hug with very, very real smiles and tears. The community of York made the trip to Portsmouth, on a gorgeous Friday night in June, in numbers and enthusiasm I simply didn’t even see coming. Their happiness over the concert and how the students did was palpable. And yet I lost sleep last night over Chamber singers going sharp on page 8?

Yup. Sure did.

Helplessness.

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cry uncle

R – What if I told you I was about ready to cry “uncle” and give in? What if I told you that our 5 year efforts of the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative have been for naught? What if I told you that I am bowing to the scattered belief that proficiency based learning in music is a fad that’s just going to fade away? What if I told you that I’ve finally just gotten too weary listening to too many music and art teachers saying that the arts are “unique” and we can’t be expected to do the same things as the other content areas due our uniqueness? What if I told you that I’m about to give up on the whole battle of fighting for standards based learning and grading? What if I told you that my degree should not have been in “music education”, but rather in “music creativity” or “student expression” or “aesthetics”?

Okay, I’ll bite. Here it goes:

The arts are unique and shouldn’t be expected to hold students to individual academic standards, much less ones that are assessed and reported. It’s okay that we can’t actually articulate what our kids are graded on. Assigning the same grade to every member of the ensemble holds academic integrity because, well, it’s an ensemble class. What we “do” in music is significantly more important than what our students learn. We aren’t teachers, we’re coaches. It’s okay to program whatever we want for our concerts just as long as our kids like it. It’s okay to not program masterful compositions by the dead composers because… well, they’re dead. It’s okay to piss and moan when we are referred to as “specials” when all we do is piss and moan about how special we are and can’t be expected to grade the same way as other subject areas. It’s okay to program what kids like and it’s even okay to have the kids select the literature for us; after all they are at least as qualified as we are with our many years of college education and experience in such matters… English and Social Studies teachers should be allowing students to choose their textbooks, right? It’s okay for our kids to sing and perform with whatever tone they want because it is about individual expression anyway. It’s okay to grade our students on participation. It’s okay to grade kids on whether or not they showed up to class and put the correct end of the trumpet to their face. As long as all the notes are played right and the audience likes what we did and we show up to the parades and town functions, our jobs are safe. It’s okay to pass out programs at our concerts that say absolutely nothing about why we are essential or why we are performing the songs listed. It’s okay that we teach with a chip on our shoulder due to the fact that nobody understands us. It’s okay that we are more concerned about creativity than developing the skills which allow students to display it. It’s okay that we are more concerned about creativity than academic accountability. It’s okay that we are more concerned about creativity than keeping the arts in our schools. We can just remove music from the curriculum completely, help the other subject areas to teach creativity, and then call it a day anyway, right? It’s okay that we run ensembles the same way they were run during the Clinton administration. It’s okay that we run ensembles the same way they were run during the Reagan administration. It’s okay that we run ensembles the same way they were run during the Nixon administration. It’s okay that my online grade book has assignments, not skills, listed horizontally across the top. It’s okay that we run co-curricular activities cleverly disguised as academic content. And get paid accordingly. It’s okay to differentiate between talent and skills. It’s okay that we focus on the kids “who want to be there”. It’s okay that we grade “intuitively”.

There’s only one problem in all this: I refuse to allow Maine’s students to live in that world. I want music education to be as academically essential as I believe it is, and my actions need to speak as loudly as my words. So I guess I’m not going to cry “uncle” just yet. As a matter of fact, I’m going to keep moving toward proficiency, academic standards and individual student accountability toward specific, measurable learning targets for as long as my administration allows me. State mandates? Don’t care. To either extreme. Giving “grades” doesn’t make music academically essential, making those grades MEAN something ACADEMICALLY does. I believe in fostering creativity and giving students an aesthetic experience. But music education is not co-curricular, and it’s essential to do those things – and more – in context. I know what work I’m going to continue doing both now and for years to come, because I couldn’t imagine doing anything less.

YHS Choral Standards 2011-2012

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creativity through music composition

R – There is a disconnect that exists in music education between creativity and assessment. I have said for many years that not all that is important can be assessed, but all that is academic can be… and all that is academically essential must be. I say it because I believe it. But where does creativity fit in? I’ve wrestled with that for years. Professionally, I have control issues. I need to dot every “i”, cross every “t” and hold every student accountable. Creativity reaches into too subjective a realm for me. However, an MAAI colleague of mine, Samantha Davis, posted a TED video on facebook a few weeks ago. She tagged me and some others and said everyone should view it. The video is entitled: Teaching art or teaching to think like an artist? | Cindy Foley. I watched and she was right. I felt myself authentically challenged to incorporate authentic creativity into my classroom.

In thinking through how to try this, I immediately came across the quandary of the large group ensemble situation where the point is to be completely subservient to the needs and requirements of each song and composer. To quote Robert Shaw, “it is the performer’s business to get out of the way of music.” He’s not incorrect. If I have 50 kids being “creative” about the song they’re singing as a choir, the results will resemble a chance meeting of the Titanic and a rogue iceberg.

But if the performance of someone else’s music requires subservience, the composition of music screams for creativity. I decided to have my Music Theory II class (composition) watch the TED video. But before I did, I gave them their next assignment: tell me in advance a self determined mood, storyline or concept of their choosing. Then they are to compose original music that reflects or depicts what they chose. They would incorporate tangible elements of knowledge they have learned to this point, but there would be no pre-determined instructions or criteria of what to use or how to use it. No parameters. I got a mild case of hives just thinking about it. Then after watching the video, I asked them if they saw the connection between the video and their next assignment. They did. I told them that my biggest fear is that my scoring criteria for it may be far too subjective, and I’d need their help. They were okay with that.

It took them several classes to complete on Finale. Tuesday morning last week we listened to the compositions. For each student we first listened without any introduction. Then we went around the room and had the others guess what they thought the maxresdefaultcomposition reflected/told. Everyone had to justify their response… factors of instrumentation, tempo, dissonance, consonance, rhythmic components, etc all played roles. Then the student who wrote the composition told the class their mood or storyline they were trying to portray. Their own justifications for choices they made initiated some amazing conversations. It was a rich dialogue. Imagery created by musical choices. Emotions created by using specific combinations of instruments. Instrument ranges. Moods created by certain tempo choices. Form and structure in music (one student in particular who brilliantly utilized simple rondo form to portray someone sleeping, being abducted by aliens, waking up and realizing it was just a dream and then falling peacefully back to sleep – think Sorcerer’s Apprentice in miniature).

Then we had the capstone conversation: did this assignment “work”; was this an effective assignment to foster creativity and was it valuable to them? Well, from the mouths of babes… they talked about how school rarely allows them to be creative. Trusting them to come up with their own parameters actually allowed them to be creative as opposed to looking at firmly placed learning targets. It was in many ways for them more difficult than one of their normal projects because they had to do all the thinking behind it(!). One of my students at the end stated that schools want students to be creative but they aren’t given the chance to be, and that this assignment required them to utilize accumulated knowledge and apply it in new, original ways (her words) that were completely unique, but which required them to make choices and decisions too. Wow.

Cindy Foley is on to something and it was a great eye opener for me. What I am morphing towards is maintaining my role as a teacher who will continue to hold students academically accountable in my music classes (sorry, “participation” is not an academically accountable indicator) and assess them formatively and summatively to inform both their learning and my teaching. However, I must also find ways to follow that up with opportunities that allow students to synthesize things; follow up in ways that promote and allow for creativity. Music Theory/Composition is an outstanding platform for this type of learning. The challenge will continue to be how to apply this to large group ensembles and to other general music courses. But if we are going to authentically be training “21st century learners and thinkers”, we’re going to have to continue to find ways to incorporate creativity into our regular curriculum. I believe it’s a challenge well worth taking on.

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shifting sands

R – When Jarika and I started this blog a few years ago, the landscape as it applied to music assessment in Maine was still a pretty static entity. A few teachers here and there were invested in it, but it was something most people wanted to find out more about (the 2011 Arts Assessment Conference had well in excess of 200 attendees). Yet it was still in infant stages of “how do we do this and why?” Now in 2015, the state has implemented its proficiency law and we are all in the throes of “assessment” and standards and proficiency.

It’s been an amazing shift. But where does it leave us? No one is utilizing the same standards (national? MLR? hybrid?). No one is reporting out the same way (standards? 108558973grades? hybrid?). No one is invested the same way (“I do it because I value it”, “I do it because my administrator told me I have to”, “I’m seeing the value even though I don’t fully believe in it”). No one does it the same way (paper/pencil tests, performance assessments, one time shots, multiple opportunities). No one reports it the same way (power school, infinite campus, mastery connect, who knows what else).

MAAI held its annual Winter Retreat for the assembled Teacher Leaders from across the state a couple of weeks ago. We collected feedback and data and it is flat out overwhelming what we have in front of us for needs. We know we want to link up with other organizations to further assessment in the arts. We know we want to further advocacy efforts and utilization of Teaching Artists. We know we want to offer professional development opportunities for every teacher in Maine, but that the needs of each are very, very unique.

Where is this all going and where does it end?

Well, I don’t know the answer to those two questions, but I do know for a fact that we’re moving and progressing and developing and morphing. And shifting. MAAI’s mission has been a simple one: Creating an environment in Maine where quality assessment in arts education is an integral part of the work all arts educators do to deepen student learning in the arts. The goal has NEVER been to utilize the same standards, report out the same way, invest the same way, do it the same way or report it all out the same way. It HAS been about deepening student learning in the arts.

As we individually and collectively continue our work, I’m imploring all of us to keep our eyes on the target. Get through whatever filters are in front of us – or imposed brick walls  – etc. etc, and keep making our work more meaningful and integral for our students. If we make our work authentic and see to it that it furthers the cause, let’s keep moving. The alternative to movement is standing still. And even though we’re in the middle of a morass of assessment soup right now, I’ll take this every day of the week as opposed to standing still. The sands are shifting and that doesn’t have to be a bad thing.

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getting off islands

R – Visual and performing Arts educators are in an extraordinarily unique situation in Maine. True for all arts educators, but especially so for PK – 8 and dance and theater of all grade levels. The situation is one of isolation. Physical and educational. It’s too easy to overlook this as a fundamental concern, due to the fact that it’s always been like this. At the conclusion of the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative’s Summit for Arts Education this past Summer, about 80 educators and teaching artists spent three and a half hours presenting closing action plans and professional development workshop proposals based on their work during the week. I left the experience inspired in many ways.

Individuals are furthering their work based on deeper understandings and discussions. For many, this took the form of changing how they will be delivering instruction. For others it ties into the logistical bear of reporting out progress towards proficiency of standards and indicators. Others still are tying in assessment strategies for the first time or redesigning their assessment practices. This has staggering ramifications for Maine’s arts classrooms and our students. Where there is a transformation of thinking, or reporting, or managing, or assessing, or delivering, there is a furthering of the Arts in Maine.

Professional Development will continue to be offered. The growth opportunities that will be available to everyone in Maine via regional workshops are tremendous, both in number and in scope of subject matter. We used to have a state that does annual “one shot deals” at state conferences for Professional Development via organizations such as NAfME or the Maine Art Education Association. Many of these workshops had little to do with assessment or standards or proficiency. Today however, that is not the case. As a matter of fact, you have to work really hard to avoid opportunities year-round to further professional growth as arts educators, particularly in standards, assessment and proficiency. The Maine Arts assessment initiative has organized and announced its Mega-Regional workshop schedule for the 2014-2015 school year. You can see what is being offered and register online here. The afternoon sessions at each of these is being devoted entirely to music educators talking to music educators about how they are doing in their transition to proficiency based assessment; visual art teachers and even drama and dance teachers doing the same. The morning sessions allow you to plug into workshops that focuses your thinking on a specific topic or strategy. Our hope is that the combination of the morning sessions coupled with the afternoon roundtables will result in attendees leaving charged and filled with practical new ideas and approaches that can immediately be applied and implemented in meaningful ways in their own journey with their own students.

But what in the meantime? Technology. Google Hangout, Skype, and my favorite: Zoom… among others to choose from. My colleagues at the high School? I talk to them all the time already, but that’s because we’re on the island together (YHS). My choral colleague at York Middle School? We google hangout twice a week. Minimum. And it is almost always random too. “I wonder if Jen’s in her planning block right now…” *Rob clicks on the video icon next to her name in gmail* She often does the same. We quickly bounce ideas off of each other or ask quick questions. Sometimes we start one at 2:30 and by 3:10 we realize we’ve been talking for 40 minutes and we are still bringing up things we want to discuss. The point is that Jen and I are no longer on our islands. We never will be again. We’ve actually had our choirs digitally perform for each other, do warmups for each other, it’s been great and we don’t even do it all as often as we want. But we make it work within our own unique confines of time. The leadership and teacher leaders of MAAI have also enjoyed great success with Zoom meetings. How great is it to be in a meeting, IMG_0907talking about the “good stuff’ while sitting in your favorite chair at home and drinking hot cider with your feet propped up on the coffee table? Let me fill you in: it’s really great!!!

I don’t mean to bore anyone to tears in the above paragraph talking about technology that I know most everyone already uses. But 2014 is the 100 year anniversary of the start of a war in which its Generals at the outset made it clear that the airplane was neat but served no strategic purpose (bonus literary points on my part for comparing google hangout to a world war). We need to be looking at strategic purpose. Why aren’t we skyping with our colleagues from the other schools in our district once a week? “I don’t have time”. Really?? You don’t eat lunch? Why aren’t we skyping every two weeks with a colleague from a similar grade level schools as ours in another town? You already know who they are, I moved to Maine in large part because of the District structure for music educators. We know our neighbors, why aren’t we talking with them more? How about skyping once a month with a colleague in a different county or part of the state. How about skyping once a quarter with a colleague from out of state??? “I don’t know anyone well enough to ask.” Don’t even go there. Are you telling me that if a music teacher from Connecticut e-mailed you and said they’d like to meet you and talk for 15 minutes about what is going on in Maine, your school and your classroom as it relates to music education you’d say “no”? Guess what – neither would they. Reach out!! Do it!! Don’t be that World War 1 General!!!

Get off your Island and keep furthering your thinking and your craft. A great reminder this past week from Hall of Fame receiver Michael Irvin who said that his coach told him throughout his career, “Either you are always working to get better, or you are automatically getting worse.” Not bad advice. Get off the island and access your colleagues in person – physically or digitally – routinely to keep furthering your growth.

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happy 3rd birthday

R – A rare midweek blog post (and on this post-election morning I could use some humor) to self-congratulate and wish a Happy Birthday to the blog! Jarika and I launched this three years ago today, and it has served as a fun little soapbox platform for us to shout from, for anyone seriously unstable enough to take the time to listen to us.

The reviews have been off the charts since we started this thing! Here’s just a few snippets of what people have said about goobermusicteachers.com over its first three years:

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

“And now, the Top Ten Reasons a person should have to be granted a permit before starting their own blog…” – David Letterman

“Congratulationsh on the chthree yearsh chapsh. I chust cantch get enough of it.” – Sean Connery

“Of all the blogs I’ve read, this is definitely one of them.” – Ashley Smith

“Where’s the beef???” – 1980’s Wendy’s commercial

“Really weak in all three phases.” –  Bill Bellichick

“You want to confuse these two? Ask them to spell ‘mom’ backwards.” – the late Joan Rivers (rest her soul)

“One does not normally encounter prose of this quality without seeing it written in crayola.” – Maureen Dowd

”                                                                          ” – Marcel Marceau

“If only I could learn to write things this scary!” – Stephen King

“The greatest contribution to Insomnia research in the last fifty years.” – Dr. Howard Terduckin

“There are many fine attributes to a blog such as this. Of course, none of them actually pertain specifically to this one, but there are indeed many fine attributes to be found in a blog such as this.” – John Cleese

“This would be far more entertaining – and enlightening – if their typewriter keyboard were replaced with emojicons.” – Al Gore

“This blog should be pay per view” – – – “Yeah, they should pay us every time we view it!!” – – – “Hahahahahahahahahahahah” – Muppets Statler & Waldorf

“The Delorean of blogs” – Lee Iacocca

“All right! This blog is TOAST!” – Bill Murray

“It keeps going, and going, and going, and going, and….” – Energizer Bunny

“I don’t always read blogs. But when I do, it’s not this one.” – World’s Most Interesting Man

“I went to a restaurant that serves ‘breakfast at any time’. So I ordered French Toast during the Renaissance.” – Stephen Wright

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